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unknown stainless steel

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unknown stainless steel

Postby Granddaddy » Tue Mar 14, 2017 7:07 am

I have quite a bit of stainless steel that was salvaged from commercial counters, not food service counters just reception type counters. my questions are:

is there a reliable way to determine the type.

if not what filler is a good work around.

is there a pretty safe assumption when dealing with stainless found on commercial counters and cabinets.

thanks guys and gals.

creek.
the heck with the duty cycle on the welder, tell me about the duty cycle on that grinder !!
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby exnailpounder » Tue Mar 14, 2017 7:29 am

Granddaddy wrote:I have quite a bit of stainless steel that was salvaged from commercial counters, not food service counters just reception type counters. my questions are:

is there a reliable way to determine the type.

if not what filler is a good work around.

is there a pretty safe assumption when dealing with stainless found on commercial counters and cabinets.

thanks guys and gals.

creek.

Check it with a magnet. The 400 series is magnetic. The 300 series is not, except for 312. Or you can do a spark test. Ferritic(400 series) will throw sparks, the 300 series(austenitic) throws less. You can find a spark chart on-line. A good all around filler for unknown alloys is 309 or 312 AKA Supermissileweld. If your metal isn't magnetic then it's a good bet that it's probably 304.
Last edited by exnailpounder on Wed Mar 15, 2017 8:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby Granddaddy » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:11 am

thanks XNP, i'll give it the magnet test.

creek
the heck with the duty cycle on the welder, tell me about the duty cycle on that grinder !!
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby Olivero » Tue Mar 14, 2017 9:53 am

Depending on what you are planning to do with it, 308 should work fine as well, just depends on the service your going to put it in after you are done with it.
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby Granddaddy » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:08 pm

thanks Mr. O,
I don't have any thing definite in mind, I have never welded stainless so I will probably start by cutting some coupons from the aprox- 3/8'ths X 1.25 corner trim pieces and trying my hand with three processes, mig, stick and tig and see how it progresses. I like giving my grandkids things I made in hopes it will mean as much to them as things my grandfathers made or owned mean to me so I am thinking tool boxes and storage boxes for their camping gear. Christmas before last I made the boys knives and sheaths and the girl a purse complete with tinkerbell buttons, my wife and daughter were quite shocked by the purse but I couldn't leave the little gal out and that's what I came up with. I also built them a little 8 foot hybrid ( forgive the spelling ) peero / john boat and man was that a hit even though you could tell it was my first boat build. oh' the first knives to.

thanks again.

creek
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby Poland308 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:09 pm

Aren't most kitchen tables and counters 316?
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby exnailpounder » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:14 pm

Poland308 wrote:Aren't most kitchen tables and counters 316?

I have always heard that common SS items are usually 304. I know 316 has better corrosion resistance than 304 so it's more expensive.
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby Poland308 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:19 pm

I've only welded on a few counters/ sinks for commercial kitchens. Those all had manufacturers name plates. I just googled them to find out the material specs.
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby exnailpounder » Tue Mar 14, 2017 5:26 pm

316 is common for marine applications and supposed to be used within 5 miles of an ocean coast. 304 is about the cheapest so you can see why manufacturers would favor it. I wonder what stainless appliances are made of...betting 400 series.
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Re: unknown stainless steel

Postby Olivero » Tue Mar 14, 2017 6:28 pm

304 is the standard kitchen grade.

The main difference between 304 and 316 is 316 has molybdenum added to it which gives it an acid resistance and so allows it to stand up to more nasty stuff.

If you'r looking to do cool little gifts like that, stainless countertops should be just fine, most likely they are 304, rarely will they be 316. You probably just want the corrosion resistance malleability of stainless for your ideas which it should offer.

Stainless welding is fairly easy, just be careful with cooking it, once stainless gets hot and molten, it tends to float some materials around which can prevent the oxide layer from building on the surface of stainless. This happens due to the chrome in it. Once metal has more than 18% chrome (Or something similar) it is considered to be "stainless" as the chrome will protect it.

I could go on for hours, I am trying to stay on track.

BUT! Most importantly, make sure you leave the torch with its postflow over the weld once your weld is done, give it a good 5-10 second post flow to allow the weld to cool with a shield over it and then your good to go, by removing it too fast you can contaminate it and once again, prevent the oxide layer from rebuilding.

By the way, that oxide layer rebuilds naturally once the chrome surface is in contact with oxygen that's why there is such a stress on not contaminating stainless, dedicated brushes, grinding wheels, etc.

Sounds like a great idea though, I think they will be happy. Are you planning on painting any of this stuff? Stainless is very good at getting discoloured after welding which ruins the aesthetics but there are ways to handle it, just depends how far you want to go.

There, I feel better now that I got to babble :lol:
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