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Interview tips

General welding questions that dont fit in TIG, MIG, Stick, or Certification etc.

Interview tips

Postby 288nicko » Wed Jun 28, 2017 1:40 am

I'm in college studying welding about to graduate. I was wondering about the actual verbal interview part. What should I wear, what sort of interview questions should I be expecting sort of thing.
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Re: Interview tips

Postby Artie F. Emm » Wed Jun 28, 2017 10:45 pm

Definitely talk to the school's placement office and a respected instructor for what to expect. An interview for a welding production position will be different for a welding engineer.
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Re: Interview tips

Postby PeteM » Thu Jun 29, 2017 2:29 am

Try not to swear too much. :lol:

Depends on the position.
Be willing and able to talk about the value of safety and a safe work environment.

For general welding be ready to weld. I have a couple of nice denim shirts and some dark colored cotton work/casual pants like Dickies from wal-mart that are cheap but look ok and I'm willing to burn.

Bring good usable PPE. (goes back to the previous two).

Ask good forward looking questions like "Do you have a list of tools that are recommended or required of me?" and "what time does my shift start?"

Research the company and what the make/do, and relate relevant experience or knowledge. You don't have to know all about it (unless you do have direct experience with their type product) but at least you did your homework.

My last couple of interviews for temp gigs were more like relaxed conversations but I made sure to hit the above elements as talking points, which got me to the walk through and weld tests. They'll glance at the resume and maybe ask a few questions, but that doesn't seem as important as it used to (to me).

Once the talk has been talked, walk the walk by doing some nice code quality welds and thank them for their consideration.



Be ready, willing, and able to pass a drug test.
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Re: Interview tips

Postby weldyM » Thu Jun 29, 2017 9:05 am

Typical questions include: Tell us about a problem you had in the past, and how you remedied it. Sometimes they've be a variation of 'Tell us how you worked with a team member to remedy a problem'.

I suggest doing as much research on the company as possible. Example: Interviewer: So tell us what you know about Eaton.
Applicant: I understand Eaton has parts on the Mars Rover.

'Well I know the company was founded in 1896, and their first parts was _________.'

So many people are just looking for a paycheck. If you have done some research that impresses them.

Be friendly respectful and don't wait to talk, LISTEN!
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Re: Interview tips

Postby MarkL » Wed Jul 12, 2017 3:30 pm

I took welding at the local community college, they had the person who helps place students at local companies come in and give a talk about interviewing and work habits. She said the top 3 reasons why students lose new jobs are using their cell phone, not showing up or showing up late, and not following safety procedures. So make sure you turn your phone off before the interview. I'd emphasize anything in the interview that will assure them those things won't be a problem. If you've had any kind of job before, mention that you always show up on time and followed all the workplace safety procedures. Make eye contact with people who interview you, don't look at your feet. Tape record yourself talking so you know how you sound, especially try to eliminate saying things like umh, it will make you sound better. Psychologically I'd try to look at the job interview as practice rather than a one time thing. Chances are you won't get the first job you interview for, so help yourself relax by viewing it as practice for the next interview. And try to smile and be friendly, a big part of choosing an employee is about whether people think they'd like to be around you all day.
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Re: Interview tips

Postby LtBadd » Wed Jul 12, 2017 5:59 pm

MarkL wrote:I took welding at the local community college, they had the person who helps place students at local companies come in and give a talk about interviewing and work habits. She said the top 3 reasons why students lose new jobs are using their cell phone, not showing up or showing up late, and not following safety procedures. So make sure you turn your phone off before the interview. I'd emphasize anything in the interview that will assure them those things won't be a problem. If you've had any kind of job before, mention that you always show up on time and followed all the workplace safety procedures. Make eye contact with people who interview you, don't look at your feet. Tape record yourself talking so you know how you sound, especially try to eliminate saying things like umh, it will make you sound better. Psychologically I'd try to look at the job interview as practice rather than a one time thing. Chances are you won't get the first job you interview for, so help yourself relax by viewing it as practice for the next interview. And try to smile and be friendly, a big part of choosing an employee is about whether people think they'd like to be around you all day.

Good stuff there ;)
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Re: Interview tips

Postby clavius » Wed Jul 19, 2017 8:58 pm

I know this OP goes back a ways, but just to add few thoughts and maybe reinforce all of the excellent advice from all of the other replies here:

I have been on both sides, having (obviously) interviewed for plenty of jobs, and also been the guy doing the interviewing for both laborer/assembler/factory type people to engineering/tech types. It's good to remember that the person doing the interview is just another person doing their job. So be friendly and respectful, but try read the level of formality they project and act accordingly.

PeteM's advice to "Try not to swear too much" is good, even if he is joking. I have had guys tossing around 4-letter expletives three minutes into an interview just because my demeanor is pretty casual. The position he was interviewing for involved lots of daily interaction with customers like doctors and high level admin people. The guy had decent technical qualifications, but I took him off the list before he finished speaking. No way would I risk that guy being the face of our group and company to our customers. Be professional. At the other end of the spectrum I had a young just out of college guy describe the control system for his capstone project as a "big box of electronics and wires and stuff.." (no kidding). Know your business.

Above all be honest and be yourself. If you are asked if you can do something specific and you can't, admit that but immediately follow with "...but I learn very quickly and learning new skills is a key part of any job for me..." or something similar. If you try to BS people you may get away with it, but it WILL catch up to you.

I'm interested in hearing how you made out since you posted this. Any updates???
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