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Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

General welding questions that dont fit in TIG, MIG, Stick, or Certification etc.

Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby Glowzinski » Wed Jul 27, 2016 9:11 pm

Alright, I have like 1/4 inch steel tube for a welding cart. Actually it may be just a bit thicker than that. Then, people told me, that for the top, I should get at least 2/4 steel. That is good. I just got my first good welder. Bobcat 250. Now, how thick can the metal be, that I weld with that thing? I know 250 is the max it can go. I THOUGHT, that while looking at a chart I have, for that size steel, it should be set from like, 250-310. Which, if is the case, would leave me just kind of standing here. haha

So, I read about the multi pass thing. I am teaching myself to weld. I believe that means that you go over something, then, you do it again. Would that be correct?

I do not yet have the top for the thing. How would welding 1/4 to 1/2 steel go? Also, I have 6011, 7012 and I believe 7018 rods. I THINK they are all 1/8. Would they work for what I need?

I am going to take a four hour class, before I start anything. Teaches me the basics of three types of welding. So, would you think stick, mig or tig would work best? I like stick welding. But, it is always fun to learn and do new things. haha

Thank you for the tips.
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby exnailpounder » Wed Jul 27, 2016 9:18 pm

I wish I still had your enthusiasm. Mig and Tig ...then stick, only as a last resort. Watch Jody's videos and send in some pic. Best of luck to you.
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby Rick_H » Wed Jul 27, 2016 10:18 pm

Are you doing the Intro to Welding class at Earl Beck?

What gas to you have?
I weld stainless, stainless and more stainless...Food Industry, sanitary process piping, vessels, whatever is needed, I like to make stuff.
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby Woodbutcher » Sun Jul 31, 2016 9:53 pm

I have to dissagree with mig, tig, then stick. Especially if you bought a bobcat! Wholly macral Andy, bobcats are a great welder, I have quite a bit of experience with them. I would weld the project your talking about with 7018 1/8 diameter electrode at around 115-125 amps, plus or minus depending on what position you're welding in. its going to take some time for you to figure out how hot to weld, for the most part its personal, as long as you stay in the general parameters. As far as multi pass welds, if you're welding a cart, its probably not really needed, if you're welding building structure or bridge structure, blue prints will tell you how much of a weld is needed. Something I was told early on was to never leave a weld that you wouldnt trust your life to. But if you're welding a welding cart, I would say just make yourself happy. I hope this gives you some confidence, dont be afraid to ask more questions. You will learn alot onyour own just by burning rod. Buy lots!
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby Artie F. Emm » Sun Jul 31, 2016 10:37 pm

Does 1/4" wall tube, and 1/2" top, strike anyone else as being a bit much for a welding cart? Seems like it would be awful dang heavy, and a lot of resources going into it. You could divide those by 2 and still have the heftiest cart ever built.

Cool that you've got a Bobcat, and the intro to different weld processes sounds like it will be a great class. Please let us know how it all goes.
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby GreinTime » Mon Aug 01, 2016 1:41 am

Artie F. Emm wrote:Does 1/4" wall tube, and 1/2" top, strike anyone else as being a bit much for a welding cart? Seems like it would be awful dang heavy, and a lot of resources going into it. You could divide those by 2 and still have the heftiest cart ever built.

Cool that you've got a Bobcat, and the intro to different weld processes sounds like it will be a great class. Please let us know how it all goes.

If he's making a worktable/cart assembly then no, I wouldn't imagine it's too much. I believe he has another post talking about metal grating for a table top. If space is limited, an integrated cart/movable table would be ideal.

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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby ex framie » Sat Aug 06, 2016 7:46 pm

Gowinski,
Sit down, grab your beverage of choice, get on Jodies site and watch his videos on what you want to do.
Thick material when starting out is an advantage, once you get competent running a bead you can work your way down in thickness and rod size and try some thinner material. 1/8 would probably be the thinnest you could weld with 1/8 rods.
Light headedness while bending over, have a talk to your doctor and find out what your blood pressure is doing while your bending over, build your welding table height to minimise your dizziness.
Also get yourself some disposable welding masks, the less fumes/smoke you breath in the better.
You've got yourself a great setup, all you need now is practice and a bit of technique you can find on Jodies site and this forum.
A couple of 4 to 5 inch grinders with different wheels would be a good investment.
Go for it.
Pete

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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby Glowzinski » Fri May 05, 2017 11:07 pm

Back again. I tried making the cart last year. I had problems. haha The metal was rectangle tube. So, it would not go tight agains other parts. Thus, there was a gap at the top and bottom. So, by time I got it hooked, it had melted holes in it.

I have the chart, showing the Miller cart. That is what I will made.

Do you think this would work?

https://www.metalsdepot.com/products/hr ... 20&aident=

I am finishing my welding table. I kept having problems with the legs bending out. So, I decided to get tube, that was like1/8 bigger. Cut it into 8, 5 inch pieces, weld that to the frame top and bottom, then put the tube for the pegs in and bolt them in. The problem is, the metal I got, was WAY to thin. The legs are 1/4 inch. The stuff I got was maybe half that. So, no way I can weld it to the 1/4 inch.

I will be getting the AHP mig welder. They say 6 months until it's in. I still love the welding thing.
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby cj737 » Sat May 06, 2017 7:29 am

I still can't decipher what you're welding exactly, but 7018 rods of 3/32" welding against 1/4" tubing will be strong enough to hold the earth together. You can run them in the 80-95 amp range. This will allow you to keep a nice tight arc, get plenty of penetration, and not burn through your material. The 1/8 rods are fine too, especially if you have gaps to bridge, and 120 amps would be just about perfect for them.

It is always my recommendation for anyone learning to weld to begin with Stick. It teaches rod manipulation, puddle observation, and the mechanics of travel, rod position, and movement. MIG is physically/functionally a lot easier to learn in my experience, though, a bit misleading. I say misleading because you can weld what appears to be a very nice bead, but when cut and sectioned, it can still lack penetration and strength. I teach new welders to TIG before MIG. They seem to perform better MIG welds after learning to read a puddle and get better burned in welds as a result.

But MIG truly requires a WPS to be safe and strong in my opinion.
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Re: Bobcat 250 and metal thickness

Postby Otto Nobedder » Sat May 06, 2017 5:46 pm

cj737 wrote:But MIG truly requires a WPS to be safe and strong in my opinion.


...Which is why I will be welding coupons for PQRs next week. I have way too much sh!t to do that's my regular job, and I have several coupons to weld for bend test, a coupon already welded for X-ray (ASME IX cert), and a "sample" piece, a pressure vessel in miniature, for the National Board, all to get our shop's "R" stamp.

We will be qualifying short-circuit MIG for adding ancillary structure to a code vessel, such as working doublers and reinforcing rings, as well as qualifying GTAW for direct repairs to the vessel (as well as piping that meets the pressure requirements to fall under code). We will then have WPSs, backed by our own PQRs.

It's been a good minute since I busted a test, but, it can happen to anyone at any time for unforeseen reasons.

I'm just representing the whole shop. No pressure. :shock:

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