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stick welding cast iron

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stick welding cast iron

Postby johndextr » Sat May 06, 2017 12:40 am

I have seen a video where some guys were welding cast iron using stick welding, there is no topic about that in the forum and I would like to know more information about it where can I get the electrodes since in welmongerstore.com isnt something like even on the videos that this master makes for us on youtube (not yet I hope) and those that I have found are expensive, so I´d appreciate some more information
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby weldin mike 27 » Sat May 06, 2017 9:01 am

cast iron can be stick welded a couple of different ways.

One is 7018 rods and preheat. The resulting weld will be hard and not drillable...ect.

Nickel Iron rods, pre heat and peen and slow cool. Do 1 inch long runs and peen the weld with a chipping hammer to allow the weld to stretch as the material contracts. slow cool in sand.

99% nickel rods and no pre heat but you have to let it cool down to hand touch temp before proceeding (actually called touch welding) inch long runs and peening as before. The goal in the short runs is to not dilute the weld metal with the cast iron basemetal more than absolute necessary.

If you have a thick piece of c/i you can "butter" the edges of the weld zone with the nickel rods. This means pad welding over the top and then welding up with another, cheaper rod, like 7018.
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby weldin mike 27 » Sat May 06, 2017 9:03 am

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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby MinnesotaDave » Sat May 06, 2017 11:46 am

Weldin_Mike: A question if I may, why use a chipping hammer for peening?
My experience, which isn't nearly as much as many others, has been to use rounded tools for peening.
Like the round end of a ball peen hammer, or a needle scaler with rounded needles.

For the OP, the two commonly available rods near me are nickel 99 and nickel 55, the Ferroweld rods listed below I have not seen in my local store.

Lincoln:
Choosing electrodes for welding cast iron typically comes down to three things: cost, machine-ability, and whether the weld is single or multiple pass.

Tech-Rod 99 (AWS class ENi-CI) is a nominally 99% Nickel electrode. Nickel is expensive, and so, therefore, is this premium electrode. The electrode will deposit welds that are machine-able, an important consideration when the casting is to be machined after welding. Repairs made with Tech-Rod 99 are often single pass welds with high admixture. Even with high admixture, the weld deposit will remain machine-able. It works best on castings with low or medium phosphorous contents.

Tech-Rod 55 (AWS class ENiFe-CI) is a nominally 55% Nickel electrode. The lower Nickel content makes this electrode more economical than Tech-Rod 99. Weld deposits are usually machine-able, but under conditions of high admixture, the welds can become hard and difficult to machine. It is often used for repairing castings with heavy or thick sections. As compared to Tech-Rod 99, welds made with 55 Ni are stronger and more ductile, and more tolerant of phosphorous in the casting. It also has a lower coefficient of expansion than 99Ni, resulting in fewer fusion line cracks.

Ferroweld (AWS class ESt) is a lower cost, steel electrode. The weld deposits are hard, and are not machine-able, but can be finished by grinding. This is the lowest cost electrode for welding cast iron, and the electrode has a very user-friendly arc. It can tolerate welding on castings that cannot be completely cleaned before welding. Ferroweld deposits will rust, just like cast iron. This may be important when repairing cast iron parts such as exhaust manifolds on antique cars.
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby weldin mike 27 » Sun May 07, 2017 8:09 am

Why not? It good for banging and also getting into a corner or groove. Id use the rounded spiky end of a chipping hammer, for likeness to the needle gun, and availability. However I, as usual, am just regurgitating info i heard other places. (I've peened welds,but that was on low alloy steel, with a needle gun.)
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby Olivero » Sun May 07, 2017 12:22 pm

IF you can, I would recommend TIG welding it.

The cast iron rods are expensive As all hell and I have considered getting them in case I couldn't fix it by TIG but I always manage to get it done with the TIG.

Regardless of welding procedure, its gotta be allowed to cool really slowly, no dousing in water, dunking in buckets, throwing it in the pond, none of that. I actually use stainless rod when I do cast, I believe its slightly more elastic than steel so the cooling process where the metal contracts doesen't seem to crack it, I like to think that's why.

You could also try stainless stick electrodes, never done that before on cast but it might work.
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby MinnesotaDave » Sun May 07, 2017 2:59 pm

You could also try tig brazing with aluminum-bronze.

I gave it a whirl a while back since Jody was kind enough to show how to do it on his website.

If it helps, here is the thread I posted: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=11339
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby Olivero » Mon May 08, 2017 12:40 pm

TIG Brazing? what on earth is that? using a brazing filler/rod but using TIG for heat instead of a torch?
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby Farmwelding » Mon May 08, 2017 1:24 pm

Olivero wrote:TIG Brazing? what on earth is that? using a brazing filler/rod but using TIG for heat instead of a torch?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wf-Cq5eQmt0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AyY0PYed3yc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQN_yz-4Hhg&t=13s

That's a start to vrything about tig brazing and brazing cast iron.
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Re: stick welding cast iron

Postby MinnesotaDave » Mon May 08, 2017 1:46 pm

Olivero wrote:TIG Brazing? what on earth is that? using a brazing filler/rod but using TIG for heat instead of a torch?


For the most part, yes. Except the filler rod isn't the flux coated oxy/acetylene rods (in my case anyway).

In the post I linked I used aluminum bronze rod.

Silicon bronze is also very common.

It was the first time I had tried TIG brazing and it went very well.
Using a foot control made it much easier than oxy/fuel in my opinion.
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