It is currently Sun Oct 22, 2017 10:27 pm Advanced search

Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Stick Welding Tips, Certification tests, machines, projects

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby Brettmm92 » Sun May 14, 2017 3:01 pm

I'm using my "welding bible" as a reference on this one.

Basically it says welding stringers are easier to lay down and CAN be as strong as weave beads. Weaves being done correctly, the bead should not exceed more than two times the rod diameter.

After reading that, for tests during school I would do stringers as they were easier to control. Instead of doing a decent weave, I made great stringers since it was easier
I wish I could do things for the second time, the first time.
Brettmm92
New Member
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Wed May 10, 2017 11:58 pm
Location: North Carolina

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby Otto Nobedder » Sun May 14, 2017 5:10 pm

Brettmm92 wrote:I'm using my "welding bible" as a reference on this one.

Basically it says welding stringers are easier to lay down and CAN be as strong as weave beads. Weaves being done correctly, the bead should not exceed more than two times the rod diameter.

After reading that, for tests during school I would do stringers as they were easier to control. Instead of doing a decent weave, I made great stringers since it was easier


Proof once again that no two welders do it quite the same. I find a weave easier, and have worked jobs where a pipe cap could be four rod diameters wide, or 1/2" for a 1/8" rod. I think I find the weave easier because my hands tend to shake slightly (have for many years, perhaps from a head injury combined with too many years of alcohol...), and when I weave, I give the shake a natural path to follow and wind up with much more consistent beads. When I have to do stringers, the shaking is a bit more random, and I get an inconsistent depth of fill.

I knew a woman who welded for Plass that could lay dead-perfect stringers 10-wide on 24" code steam pipe. I envied that steadiness. She was also the only person who smelled good on the elevator...

Steve
User avatar
Otto Nobedder
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 8391
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2011 11:40 pm
Location: Near New Orleans

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby Farmwelding » Sun May 14, 2017 5:36 pm

Yeah I'm like Steve my stringers are crap especially compared to my weaves-weaves aren't perfect but still

It seems to be a lot more forgiving in every regard-shakiness included.
A student now but really want to weld everyday. Want to learn everything about everything. Want to become a knower of all and master of none.
Instagram: @farmwelding
Nick
Farmwelding
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 1302
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 11:37 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby PeteM » Sun May 14, 2017 5:40 pm

Otto Nobedder wrote: I think I find the weave easier because my hands tend to shake slightly

I knew a woman who welded for Plass that could lay dead-perfect stringers 10-wide on 24" code steam pipe. I envied that steadiness. She was also the only person who smelled good on the elevator...

Steve


Of any number of things it could be, one likelihood is manganism.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manganism

Also, I'd heard (some studies in psych courses I took) that women generally have better fine motor skill and articulation. I taught my niece to weld, and she picked it up very quickly and demonstrated a great deal of skill (running 3G in a couple of hours, and overhead in a similar time frame). In production she did great too, but has given it up for a while to raise her kids.
PeteM
Ace
 
Posts: 294
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2016 11:28 am
Location: Pittsburgh

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby Farmwelding » Wed May 17, 2017 10:35 am

I took the 3g test with the wrong plates last night(they were a little short) but they fit into the bender and I passed flawlessly on the root and had just a speck of porosity on the face on one of my restarts. Before I burned 7018, I thought I was never going to be able to stick weld because I sucked, but after passing 1 2g and 3g bend test in about 24 hours total practice time and test time, I think I have a shot at getting good at stick after a good bit of practice which will be all the time. I am kind of sad that yesterday was the last day because I was looking forward to overhead. :cry:

Now a question: The other students who are actually taking the class and there more than me said either 3g or 4g was harder. There was no concesus. Is there one that is harder, or is it per person? Is there one that requires more skill?
A student now but really want to weld everyday. Want to learn everything about everything. Want to become a knower of all and master of none.
Instagram: @farmwelding
Nick
Farmwelding
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 1302
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 11:37 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby PeteM » Wed May 17, 2017 12:27 pm

Its person to person. Once you have a good bit of time on the metal, get comfortable with a good setting and get used to the actual motion- they're pretty much all the same. You can't get complacent (not that you would) and assume that the weld will make itself, but it does get easier.

Just don't get too into what you're listening to on the I pod and use the stinger to crash the cymbal. That makes a mess. :lol:
PeteM
Ace
 
Posts: 294
Joined: Sat Dec 03, 2016 11:28 am
Location: Pittsburgh

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby Farmwelding » Wed May 17, 2017 1:50 pm

PeteM wrote:Its person to person. Once you have a good bit of time on the metal, get comfortable with a good setting and get used to the actual motion- they're pretty much all the same. You can't get complacent (not that you would) and assume that the weld will make itself, but it does get easier.

Just don't get too into what you're listening to on the I pod and use the stinger to crash the cymbal. That makes a mess. :lol:

Yeah I hear you on that. I will rarely listen to music when I weld. Usually tig welding since it usual is a little quieter at least for DC. And I try to wear ear plugs to and even without ear plugs I don't need any more noise. Although it would be pretty funny to watch somebody do a nice cymbal crash.

And I know never to get to comfortable running something. That's when undercut, slag inclusions, and all the other fun stuff happens.
A student now but really want to weld everyday. Want to learn everything about everything. Want to become a knower of all and master of none.
Instagram: @farmwelding
Nick
Farmwelding
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 1302
Joined: Thu Mar 10, 2016 11:37 pm
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby olek » Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:37 am

Otto Nobedder wrote:
Brettmm92 wrote:I'm using my "welding bible" as a reference on this one.

Basically it says welding stringers are easier to lay down and CAN be as strong as weave beads. Weaves being done correctly, the bead should not exceed more than two times the rod diameter.

After reading that, for tests during school I would do stringers as they were easier to control. Instead of doing a decent weave, I made great stringers since it was easier


Proof once again that no two welders do it quite the same. I find a weave easier, and have worked jobs where a pipe cap could be four rod diameters wide, or 1/2" for a 1/8" rod. I think I find the weave easier because my hands tend to shake slightly (have for many years, perhaps from a head injury combined with too many years of alcohol...), and when I weave, I give the shake a natural path to follow and wind up with much more consistent beads. When I have to do stringers, the shaking is a bit more random, and I get an inconsistent depth of fill.

I knew a woman who welded for Plass that could lay dead-perfect stringers 10-wide on 24" code steam pipe. I envied that steadiness. She was also the only person who smelled good on the elevator...

Steve



I agree that any small repetitive motion helps (me) to keep the arm forearm etc relax. For whatever reason.

Now anyway I want the puddle to tell me if I need to accelerste or slow, if the angle need to be corrected, so moving relax butg not managing the puddle at the same time is probably not the way to go.

I noticed that I obtained the best "cooking" when making small circles (2 rod thickness diameter)
The covering just goes out immediately. I wish I can obtain the same with stringers
.
So small circles mean less heat (but well distributed) .? That is why I was said these are better used on thin materials...

Regards
Pianos , restorer and tuner (technician)
Dedicated to learn stick welding since april
slowly learning ;) not complaining of doing beads and beads

pro inverter PROGYS 200 FV PFC CEL+tig lift & end of arc regulation
olek
Guide
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: France

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby olek » Fri Jun 09, 2017 7:17 am

4G SHOULD be harder .
My friend who welded pipes some time ago say 3g is "easy" because we are guided (making beads or stingers vertical on a flat surface is more difficult, while with a corner or a 60 deg angle the walls are used to mount the beads.)

@farmwelding, if you may want to keep some "bible" all the guides and posters on the Lincoln web site can be obtained "free" just pass an "order" for what you'd like to receive ( very good pocket guides for different processes all those can be downloaded too)

here you can download the 'stick welding guide' it is a really good reference. If you do not have it yet ..http://lincolnelectric.com/assets/globa ... /c2410.pdf
Pianos , restorer and tuner (technician)
Dedicated to learn stick welding since april
slowly learning ;) not complaining of doing beads and beads

pro inverter PROGYS 200 FV PFC CEL+tig lift & end of arc regulation
olek
Guide
 
Posts: 174
Joined: Sat Jun 03, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: France

Re: Weaving vs stringer and tips for a 3G test

Postby Poland308 » Fri Jun 09, 2017 6:14 pm

Farmwelding wrote:Now a question: The other students who are actually taking the class and there more than me said either 3g or 4g was harder. There was no concesus. Is there one that is harder, or is it per person? Is there one that requires more skill?


Pipe 6G small bore 2 inch sch 40 open root 6010. 7018 cap stringers only.
I have more questions than answers

Josh
Poland308
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 2222
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 8:45 pm
Location: Iowa

PreviousNext

Return to Stick Welding/Arc Welding - Shielded Metal Arc Welding