It is currently Sun Apr 30, 2017 6:49 am Advanced search

Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Tig welding tips, questions, equipment, applications, instructions, techniques, tig welding machines, troubleshooting tig welding process

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby donzi426 » Sat Mar 04, 2017 3:23 am

Thanks Dave. I'll try more heat.
donzi426
New Member
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 6:42 am
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby donzi426 » Sat Mar 04, 2017 3:27 am

Thanks Steve S. I've tried the weld and grind on a couple of the cruddy welds. I only have 308 rods, but I'll order some 309 today.
donzi426
New Member
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 6:42 am
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby exnailpounder » Sat Mar 04, 2017 10:14 am

ER70 S6 is supposed to be good for dirty metal too. I am staying in the gas-issue, laywire cold puddle camp. I have never seen sparks come from anything other than trying to weld over millscale and OP says the shoes are sand blasted. I have had similar issues welding railroad spikes but they are soaked with creosote so trouble is expected but brand new horseshoes? Modern horseshoes would have to be, at least, a half-way decent alloy.
Ifyoucantellmewhatthissaysiwillbuyyouabeer.
exnailpounder
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 2252
Joined: Thu Dec 25, 2014 9:25 am
Location: near Chicago

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby MinnesotaDave » Sat Mar 04, 2017 12:00 pm

Otto Nobedder wrote:I'm in the "metal quality" camp on this, especially after the comment about sparks around the weld.

Higher quality shoes are available, but to work what you have, the fix is simple. Weld, grind, weld again. (Only where needed, of course.) You can grind about half the depth where it's porous, and re-weld.

I also recommend 309 for filler in all passes, because it resists porosity in poorer quality base metals, and this application is non-critical.

Steve S


I agree with 309. I've used it on horseshoes too and it welds very nice :D

I've never had to grind welds on bulk ordered new horseshoes so something other than metal may be wrong?

Or maybe I've just been lucky :)
Dave J.

Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

Airco 300 - Syncro 350
Invertec v250-s
Thermal Arc 161 and 300
MM210
Dialarc
Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.
User avatar
MinnesotaDave
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2013 10:57 pm
Location: Bemidji MN, U.S.A.

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby exnailpounder » Sat Mar 04, 2017 12:56 pm

MinnesotaDave wrote:
Otto Nobedder wrote:I'm in the "metal quality" camp on this, especially after the comment about sparks around the weld.

Higher quality shoes are available, but to work what you have, the fix is simple. Weld, grind, weld again. (Only where needed, of course.) You can grind about half the depth where it's porous, and re-weld.

I also recommend 309 for filler in all passes, because it resists porosity in poorer quality base metals, and this application is non-critical.

Steve S


I agree with 309. I've used it on horseshoes too and it welds very nice :D

I've never had to grind welds on bulk ordered new horseshoes so something other than metal may be wrong?

Or maybe I've just been lucky :)

That's why I am staying in the camp I am in. Horseshoes can't be brittle so they can't be cast iron but I bet they are forged steel and it should weld just fine. Farriers still have to heat and custom fit pre-made shoes because you can't take your horse to Shoe Carnival and let him try them on so I am betting its a torch nut error.
Ifyoucantellmewhatthissaysiwillbuyyouabeer.
exnailpounder
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 2252
Joined: Thu Dec 25, 2014 9:25 am
Location: near Chicago

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby Poland308 » Sat Mar 04, 2017 1:26 pm

They very well could be some kind of cast steel or pig iron. Forged in outer china from old tin army badges and medals. Shipped over in an open wood crate on the deck of a ship. Rusted for months in a ship yard then sand blasted and sold on the cheap. Looking at the closeup pick you can see it has a poor quality to the metal that looks more than surface deep. Perfect for art. But probably looked over or tossed out by the ferrier.
I have more questions than answers

Josh
Poland308
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 1811
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 8:45 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby exnailpounder » Sat Mar 04, 2017 2:14 pm

Poland308 wrote:They very well could be some kind of cast steel or pig iron. Forged in outer china from old tin army badges and medals. Shipped over in an open wood crate on the deck of a ship. Rusted for months in a ship yard then sand blasted and sold on the cheap. Looking at the closeup pick you can see it has a poor quality to the metal that looks more than surface deep. Perfect for art. But probably looked over or tossed out by the ferrier.

You're probably right. If it was me...I would just Silbr the things and be done with it. I think the nice gold color would make it look cool. I can't believe we spent 4 pages fighting over horseshoes...oh wait...yes I can :lol:
Ifyoucantellmewhatthissaysiwillbuyyouabeer.
exnailpounder
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 2252
Joined: Thu Dec 25, 2014 9:25 am
Location: near Chicago

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby MinnesotaDave » Sat Mar 04, 2017 2:19 pm

I was starting to consider metal being the problem except for exnailpounder claiming "torch nut error."

Now that's my favorite reason because it makes me laugh and I no longer want to consider metal as the problem.
Dave J.

Beware of false knowledge; it is more dangerous than ignorance. ~George Bernard Shaw~

Airco 300 - Syncro 350
Invertec v250-s
Thermal Arc 161 and 300
MM210
Dialarc
Tried being normal once, didn't take....I think it was a Tuesday.
User avatar
MinnesotaDave
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 1373
Joined: Sun Oct 27, 2013 10:57 pm
Location: Bemidji MN, U.S.A.

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby donzi426 » Sat Mar 04, 2017 4:59 pm

Today I tried something and I believe it works. Didn't clean or sand the horseshoes. Raised the heat to 180 Amps. Raised the gas flow to 20 CFH (lowering it just caused a mess). Used 70R-6 filler rod. Concentrated on the arc angle and bingo. Pretty nice weld. The second side wasn't as pretty, but I think by doing the first side it must release some of the contaminants in these shoes. See photos. I want to thank everyone who contributed to my post. Those suggestions did help.
Attachments
IMG_7126.JPG
IMG_7126.JPG (51.45 KiB) Viewed 44 times
Last edited by donzi426 on Sat Mar 04, 2017 5:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
donzi426
New Member
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 6:42 am
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Having trouble Tig welding horseshoes

Postby donzi426 » Sat Mar 04, 2017 5:00 pm

That was the second side. This photo is the first side.
Attachments
IMG_7125.JPG
IMG_7125.JPG (34.25 KiB) Viewed 45 times
donzi426
New Member
 
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Mar 02, 2017 6:42 am
Location: Long Island, NY

PreviousNext

Return to Tig Welding - Tig Welding Aluminum - Tig Welding Techniques - Aluminum Tig Welding