It is currently Wed Dec 13, 2017 1:05 am Advanced search

Cutting your tungsten?

Tig welding tips, questions, equipment, applications, instructions, techniques, tig welding machines, troubleshooting tig welding process

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby pavetim » Sat Mar 11, 2017 4:26 pm

I just stopped there and grabbed some diamond wheels
pavetim
Workhorse
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:10 pm

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby Keith_J » Sat Mar 11, 2017 5:08 pm

What I've learned is snapping can induce fractures that pop the electrode at the worst time.. Like on 100% RT welds.

Tungsten electrodes are made from tungsten powder that has been sintered into rod that has nearly the density of elemental tungsten. While it seems a solid, it behaves more like a ceramic.
Keith_J
Workhorse
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2016 1:55 am
Location: Central Texas

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby kiwi2wheels » Sat Mar 11, 2017 7:21 pm

Keith_J wrote:What I've learned is snapping can induce fractures that pop the electrode at the worst time.. Like on 100% RT welds.

Tungsten electrodes are made from tungsten powder that has been sintered into rod that has nearly the density of elemental tungsten. While it seems a solid, it behaves more like a ceramic.


Interesting. That would go towards the explanation I was given about one reason some tungstens are total crap, in as much as the additive elements are not distributed in a fully homogeneous mix.
kiwi2wheels
Ace
 
Posts: 271
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:27 am

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby Keith_J » Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:57 am

Certainly..I've been meaning to check electrode density on my lab scale and see how close to the known density of pure W they are..of course this would be comparing same types of differing brands.

This all started when one of my sons expressed interest in having a solid lump of tungsten and he found tungsten spheres online..only they advertised density of 11 to 15 grams per cubic centimeter. Pure tungsten is close to gold in density, 19.3 g/cc.

What does this mean for welding? Plenty. Voids mean lower current capacity and potential cracking, contamination and ugly performance.

Not to sound xenophobic but most electrodes are now Chinese.
Keith_J
Workhorse
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Tue Dec 20, 2016 1:55 am
Location: Central Texas

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby kiwi2wheels » Mon Mar 13, 2017 5:00 pm

Keith_J wrote:Certainly..I've been meaning to check electrode density on my lab scale and see how close to the known density of pure W they are..of course this would be comparing same types of differing brands.

This all started when one of my sons expressed interest in having a solid lump of tungsten and he found tungsten spheres online..only they advertised density of 11 to 15 grams per cubic centimeter. Pure tungsten is close to gold in density, 19.3 g/cc.

What does this mean for welding? Plenty. Voids mean lower current capacity and potential cracking, contamination and ugly performance.

Not to sound xenophobic but most electrodes are now Chinese.


It's not xenophobic, it's a fact that poor tungsten performance has only reared its head since the majority were manufactured in China. Here's a reply I received from a reputable US supplier.

" I agree with you regarding the tungstens coming out of China. Most of the ones on the market today are not very good quality. I have personally been to the factory that supplies our tungstens just to make sure they are following our quality requirements. Most companies don't do that. They just buy from the lowest price person of the day hawking tungsten electrodes."

Which explains a lot.
kiwi2wheels
Ace
 
Posts: 271
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2013 10:27 am

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby pavetim » Mon Mar 13, 2017 6:10 pm

What are good ones then? Weldcraft, ck arc-zone?
pavetim
Workhorse
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:10 pm

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby Poland308 » Mon Mar 13, 2017 7:06 pm

I buy the cheap ones from the LWS. Usually (anchor?) or some other kind. Only ever got bad containers/batches a couple of times. Once was a batch that split randomly. Threw em out. And the other time was an odd OD. they were under 1/8 and wouldn't stay tight in a collet. Threw em out. I've bought name brand stuff too. But never really noticed enough of a diferance to say I'd only use one brand.
I have more questions than answers

Josh
Poland308
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 2304
Joined: Thu Sep 10, 2015 8:45 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby weldin mike 27 » Tue Mar 14, 2017 1:07 am

In Australia, the thoriated ones snap the cleanest, on the edge of a sharp bench with a good solid hit. We recently changed to grey ones (ceriated) they don't snap very well at all, but turns out they were terrible quality and wouldn't hold a point. Then we changed again to Rare Earth ones (turquoise) these snap easily on the bench again.

Mick
User avatar
weldin mike 27
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 3378
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2011 10:59 pm
Location: Australia; Victoria

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby exnailpounder » Tue Mar 14, 2017 6:46 am

pavetim wrote:What are good ones then? Weldcraft, ck arc-zone?

Wolfram. Made in Germany. Twice the price of Chiwanese but worth it IMO...Arc Zone.
Ifyoucantellmewhatthissaysiwillbuyyouabeer.
exnailpounder
Weldmonger
 
Posts: 2461
Joined: Thu Dec 25, 2014 9:25 am
Location: near Chicago

Re: Cutting your tungsten?

Postby pavetim » Tue Mar 14, 2017 8:32 am

Yeah I didn't realize till I started researching but I read the USA isn't making tungsten anymore, they are stock pilling it for the future so most of them are made with Chinese materials. Also read that top quality ones are Wolfram, Sylvania, CK worldwide, Weldcraft, Diamond Ground. There maybe others but that's just what was in the article. I may try some Wolframs or get the Diamond thoriated Cryogenic treated one. I now cryo treatment works on engine parts and brake discs so can't hurt on tungsten. Jody should do a video on those exotic ones.
pavetim
Workhorse
 
Posts: 73
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 11:10 pm

PreviousNext

Return to Tig Welding - Tig Welding Aluminum - Tig Welding Techniques - Aluminum Tig Welding