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ruptured gas regulator question

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ruptured gas regulator question

Postby Josh MacD » Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:42 pm

When switching out an empty tank for a new/full one (75/25) I had a problem with the regulator. Forgive my ignorance on the correct names for these things, but...

When I turned on the new tank pressure (the regulator was already attached) I think I may have done it too quickly. There is hole about 1/8th inch in diameter on the bottom of bell shaped housing that received the 'T' handled adjustment knob. This started releasing gas and the hose pressure gauge pegged at over 35. I think I may have ruptured the valve in the regulator. If the tank is open, that little hole is releasing pressure and the hose gauge is spiked all of the way up. The tank pressure gauge reads at 2100, so I think the 'upstream' side of the regulator is ok.

Any thoughts?
My wife's uncle that sold it to me, with my full rig, a while back thinks the regulator needs a $30 rebuild. Am I better off with that or buying a new one? If I should get a new one, is this a 'get what you pay for' kind of deal or is a cheap-o one sufficient?

Thanks
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Re: ruptured gas regulator question

Postby Artie F. Emm » Tue Sep 05, 2017 2:08 pm

A couple thoughts / ideas.

Amazon has MIG flowmeters starting at $26, so if you are using a regulator currently, a flowmeter might be a step up for you.

Your uncle's estimate of $30 to rebuild is a bit optimistic: you might be able to find a rebuild kit and DIY the repair for about $30, but having someone else do it will be more expensive. I had a good experience with this place:
http://www.regulatortorchrepair.com/
...when I sent a cutting torch in for repair. You can give them a call or click around on the site for an estimate of the expense. The repaired equipment comes back in immaculate, tested condition. This may be a worthwhile option if you're attached to the equipment.

If the regulator is a well known brand, if you can find a rebuild kit, and if and you're willing, the DIY rebuild is not out of the question... but it does require a certain amount of faith in your own mechanical aptitude.
Dave
aka "RTFM"
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Re: ruptured gas regulator question

Postby Josh MacD » Tue Sep 05, 2017 5:40 pm

What makes a flowmeter an upgrade? It strikes me as more likely to break when my son throws something in my garage. Is it more accurate or easy to adjust accurately? And with the regulator being so much more expensive, why would anyone chose that option?

I ask out of ignorance, like most of my conversations.
Josh MacD
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Re: ruptured gas regulator question

Postby LtBadd » Tue Sep 05, 2017 6:07 pm

Josh MacD wrote:What makes a flowmeter an upgrade? It strikes me as more likely to break when my son throws something in my garage. Is it more accurate or easy to adjust accurately? And with the regulator being so much more expensive, why would anyone chose that option?

I ask out of ignorance, like most of my conversations.

With a flow meter you can see the flow rate with better resolution (and adjustment) then a pressure gage, but then I've always used a flow meter and rarely see the pressure regulator in the shops I've been in, but then there are many shops I haven't been in :lol: :lol: :lol:
Richard

Insert witty, sarcastic, or philosophical remark here.
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Re: ruptured gas regulator question

Postby Poland308 » Tue Sep 05, 2017 7:01 pm

Even a flow meter has a regulator diaphragm inside it. It's just not easily adjusted. But usually set at a fixed output pressure like 50 psi. This constant pressure makes it possible to easily adjust flow rates with the needle valve. Sounds like your regulator has a hole or crack in the diaphragm. Most likely it's a series of metal diaphragms. If it was a flammable gas regulator like acetylene or propane I'd just replace it.A rebuild kit would be a reasonable option for repair. But you will save money down the road by investing in a flow meter now.
I have more questions than answers

Josh
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